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Tropical Storms and Hurricanes

Hurricane Season runs from June 1st through November 30th, sharply peaking from late August through September. The statistical peak of the Atlantic Hurricane Season is September 10th. During hurricane season, the threat for all Tribal Reservations and Communities is ever present. Hurricane preparation should be considered a year-round job.

Tropical Depression

A tropical cyclone where the maximum sustained wind speed is 38 mph or less.

Tropical Storm

A tropical cyclone where the maximum sustained surface and wind speed ranges from 39 mph to 73 mph.

Hurricane

A tropical cyclone where the maximum sustained surface wind is 74 mph or more.

Tropical Storm or Hurricane Watch

Tropical storm (sustained winds of at least 39 mph) or Hurricane (sustained winds of at least 74 mph) conditions are possible in the area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the watches are issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds.

Tropical Storm or Hurricane Warning

Tropical storm (sustained winds of at least 39 mph) or Hurricane (sustained winds of at least 74 mph) conditions are expected somewhere in your area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the warnings are issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds.

When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane poses a threat to you

Emergency Management staff closely monitor tropical weather conditions, and are in regular contact with the National Hurricane Center and our own team of Meteorologists. We communicate important information by email and CodeRED alert notifications providing Local Citizens and Employees the information they need, and ample time to prepare. Additional information is always available through local media as well.

Hurricane Category Ratings (Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale)

Category 1 - Minimal (74-95 mph winds)
Very dangerous winds will produce some damage. Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

Category 2 - Moderate (96-110 mph winds)
Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage. Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3 - Extensive (111-129 mph winds)
Devastating damage will occur, and well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

Category 4 - Extreme (130-156 mph winds)
Catastrophic damage will occur, and well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5 - Catastrophic (157 mph or higher winds)
Catastrophic damage will occur. A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.



Alert Warning

Please continue to visit this page and our Facebook page at Dixie County Emergency Services for continued updates.






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